Clinical Pilates in Practice: Hip-Spine Syndrome (January 2022)

 

This narrative review explains the mechanism by which abnormal hip pathologies contribute to low back pain in patients without hip osteoarthritis.

 

Anthony N Khoury, Munif Hatem, Joshua Bowler, Hal David Martin, Hip–spine syndrome: rationale for ischiofemoral impingement, femoroacetabular impingement and abnormal femoral torsion leading to low back pain, Journal of Hip Preservation Surgery, hnaa054.

 

KEY POINTS: HIP-SPINE SYNDROME

  • Hip abnormalities limiting hip flexion and/or extension require compensation from the pelvis and lumbar spine for the lack of sagittal movement at the hip.
  • Between 13.1% and 37.5% of the total hip flexion is provided by the pelvis through sagittal movement at the lumbopelvic area.
  • Abnormalities at the hip joint contributing to low back pain include flexion deformities, osteoarthritis, developmental dysplasia, and limited hip range of movement.
  • The bony overgrowth of a cam impingement produces shear forces resulting in...
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Anatomy Review: Iliocapsularis & Other Muscles of the Hip Capsule (October 2020)

An informal poll of our colleagues has concluded that no-one knew that the iliocapsularis muscle existed until two days ago… This got us thinking about other muscles of the hip that insert into the joint capsule, and their role in hip function and movement dysfunction.

 

ANATOMY REVIEW: ILIOCAPSULARIS

  • The iliocapsularis is a constant muscle. ie., found in all human specimens!
  • Origin = Inferior border of the anterior inferior iliac spine + antereomedial joint capsule.
  • Insertion = Distal to the lesser trochanter.
  • Runs anterolaterally to posteromedially.
  • Lies under rectus femoris and lateral to iliacus (sometimes blends with iliacus).
  • Contraction pulls the hip joint capsule zona orbicularis superomedially -> stabilizing the hip anteriorly.
  • Hypertrophy of the iliocapsularis is seen in patients with hip dysplasia, particularly helping to stabilize the femoral head when there is a deficient acetabulum.

Iliocapsularis limits synovial impingement between the...

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Anatomy Links: What is the Iliocapsularis Muscle?

An informal poll of our colleagues has concluded that no-one knew that the iliocapsularis muscle existed until two days ago… This got us thinking about other muscles of the hip that insert into the joint capsule, and their role in hip function and movement dysfunction.

Let’s dive in.  

 

Key Points: Iliocapsularis
  • The iliocapsularis is a constant muscle. ie., found in all human specimens!
  • Origin = Inferior border of the anterior inferior iliac spine + antereomedial joint capsule.
  • Insertion = Distal to the lesser trochanter.
  • Runs anterolaterally to posteromedially.
  • Lies under rectus femoris and lateral to iliacus (sometimes blends with iliacus).
  • Contraction pulls the hip joint capsule zona orbicularis superomedially -> stabilizing the hip anteriorly. 

  • Hypertrophy of the iliocapsularis is seen in patients with hip dysplasia, particularly helping to stabilize the femoral head when there is a deficient acetabulum.
  • Iliocapsularis limits...
Continue Reading...
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